Canned Wisdom #8

Good morning, it’s Monday once more. Time for some questionable writing advice:

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For last week’s Canned Wisdom, click here.

A story, or a book, is a promise. The book promises to tell an entertaining story, and the reader promises to stick with it until the end.

If the book breaks its promise, the reader is okay to do the same. If the book isn’t what it promised to be, why continue reading it – and why read anything else by the writer? Time is, by and far, the most valuable thing we have, so why give it to an inanimate object, like a book, that doesn’t keep its promises? (thanks for reading btw).

However, a book, in and of itself, can’t make any promises of its own.

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A mysterious morning fog. What promise does that make?

The promises are understood by the reader based on their impression of the book. The cover image, the title, the blurb on the back, and whatever they see inside when they open it up for a look. In other words, you as the writer are responsible for making the book give the right kind of promise.

Pick a cover image that gives the right impression. Write a blurb that’s relevant to the story.

Write a story that lives up to the expectations it creates.

The promises don’t stop outside the book, but keep being made within. Whatever happens throughout the story sets an expectation in the reader’s mind for something that will happen later. It’s a promise of what’s to come.

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The promise of a rising sun and a beautiful day to come. If it rains the morning breaks its promise.

Did I go on about this last week too?

Yes, I’m pretty sure I did, but I’m doing it again, because I think this is important. If you make someone a promise you have to keep it – even if it’s to a person you’ve never met and who only knows you from picking up your book.

So how do you know what kind of promise you make to the reader?

Simple answer: you don’t know.

You’ll just have to guess. You have to figure it out yourself based on the story you’re writing. With some parts of it it’s easy, and with other parts it’s not.  This is one of the reason it’s a good idea to ask someone else to test read your stories and give you feedback before you release them into the wild.

Since you already know what’s going to happen, it’ll be hard for you to expect anything else.

 

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Canned Wisdom #8

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